Children and Families

The Estonian child and family policy is based on the "Development Plan for Children and Families for 2012–2020", which has been adopted by the republic's government at the end of 2011. The overall objective of the Development Plan for Children and Families is to ensure the well-being of children and families, thereby encouraging the growth of the population. The extent, to which we contribute to the well-being of children and families, will sooner or later be reflected in the population's health, education, crime, the economy and employment.

Objectives of the Development Plan for Children and Families

  1. The Estonian child and family policy is knowledge-based and unified, supporting the sustainability of the society.
  2. Estonia is a country that supports the positive parenthood, which offers the necessary support for child-rearing and parenting, in order to improve the child's life quality and future prospects.
  3. Children's rights are secured, and there is created a functioning child protection system, in order to enhance a safe environment, which would support every child in the society, as well as its development and well-being.
  4. In Estonia, there is a combined allowances and services system, which supports families' adequate economic coping and offers them a permanent feeling of security.
  5. Men and women have equal opportunities for work, family life and private life, in order to promote the quality everyday life of each family member, according to their needs.

Enduring principles of the Development Plan for Children and Family

  1. Every child is precious.

  2. People's mutual care, equal opportunities, and gender equality are the pillars of modern society.

  3. Prevention of problems is more effective than mitigating their effects.

  4. Cooperation with professionals and practitioners in the related fields are of primary importance in implementing ideas.

  5. A life cycle-based approach enables the holistic solution of challenges of the family policy.

  6. A knowledge-based approach and its continuity help develop a better child and family policy.

 

Last updated: 17 November 2015